Archivio mensile:giugno 2017

From Caravaggio to Bernini. Masterpieces of the Italian Seicento from the Spanish Royal Collection

From Caravaggio to Bernini. Masterpieces of the Italian Seicento from the Spanish Royal Collection; Roma, Scuderie del Quirinale, April 14 – July, 30 2017

Through a remarkable selection of paintings and sculptures, the exhibition ‘From Caravaggio to Bernini. Masterpieces of the Italian Seicento from the Spanish Royal Collection’ reflects the close political links and cultural strategies established by the Spanish court and the Italian states over the course of the 17th century.

Curated by Gonzalo Redín Michaus

Link for Info and Ticket

 

Via Giustiniani, Roma, Lazio, Italia

Bags Free present Pasquino, the first “talking statue” of Rome

Pasquino or Pasquin (Latin: Pasquillus) is the name used by Romans since the early modern period to describe a battered Hellenistic-style statue dating to the third century BC, which was unearthed in the Parione district of Rome in the fifteenth century. It is located in a piazza of the same name on the southwest corner of the Palazzo Braschi (Museo di Roma); near the site where it was unearthed. The statue is known as the first of the talking statues of Rome, because of the tradition of attaching anonymous criticisms to its base.

Pasquino, the first "talking statue" of Rome

Pasquino, the first “talking statue” of Rome

The statue’s fame dates to the early sixteenth century, when Cardinal Oliviero Carafa draped the marble torso of the statue in a toga and decorated it with Latin epigrams on the occasion of Saint Mark’s Day.

Pasquino, the first "talking statue" of Rome

 

The Cardinal’s actions led to a custom of criticizing the pope or his government by the writing of satirical poems in broad Roman dialect—called “pasquinades” from the Italian “pasquinate”—and attaching them to the statue “Pasquino”.

Thus Pasquino became the first “talking statue” of Rome. He spoke out about the people’s dissatisfaction, denounced injustice, and assaulted misgovernment by members of the Church. From this tradition are derived the English-language terms pasquinade and pasquil, which refer to an anonymous lampoon in verse or prose.*

*testo ripreso da Wikipedia